Exam Study Guides

Exam #1 study guide
Exam #2 study guide
Exam #3 study guide



Information for Exam 1                                                          spring 2009

 

The exam is closed-book, consists of two parts, and covers the material of the textbook, chapters 1-4.

In part 1, the questions will be just like Quiz #1 and will use the same terms list. Expect more of the short answer/short paragraph type of question, however (similar to nos. 4, 6, & 7 in the sample exam below).

In part 2,  you will watch two short film clips (between 2-4 minutes long) and for each one do the following:

(1) Summarize plot elements.

(2) List and rank sound elements (speech/effects/music).

(3) Answer an interpretive or analytical question about the music.

My grading priorities in part 2. For questions (1) and (2), I will put the emphasis on whether you found the most important points. Trying to list all the details exhaustively is not really necessary. In (3), I will rarely be looking for a single right answer (that would happen only in the most obvious possible case, where the sound track beats us over the head in the most unambiguous way – and of course I'm not likely to pick a scene that does that). Instead, I want to see if you can use the sound-elements information as the basis for a coherent statement about sound/image relations or about sound's/music's narrative functions.


MUS 337 Exam 1: Sample Test


Name____________________

This exam lasts 60 minutes.

Part I:

1-3. Define the following terms:

1. distortion

2. sound bridge

3. anempathetic

4. Distinguish between sound lag and sound advance.

5. "Looping" is a synonym for ________________________________

6. In a scene dominated by a conversation between two people, in what ways might ambient sound (or generic sound) add value

7.  Provide at least three examples of an anempathetic diegetic music.


Part II:

1. Scene: Glory, latter part of scene in Antietam field hospital, Shaw at party in Boston. The clip will be played three times. The scene lasts about 4 minutes.


Answer the following:

a. Summarize the plot elements in this scene.


b. List and rank sound elements (speech/effects/music).

 

c. Answer ONE of the following questions:

1. Is music always subordinate to the image in this scene? If so, describe the supporting role that music plays, in particular any ways that music contributes something new, beyond what we see or hear in dialogue. If not, describe how music takes over and explain why that happens.

2. Provide reasons for your choices in the list under (b) above. Don't forget the obvious, such as "music is diegetic because we see her singing." And be sure to provide any necessary qualifying comments, if, for example, music is not securely in the diegetic or non-diegetic category.

 

2. Scene: Catch Me if You Can, "Christmas" scene. The clip will be played three times. The scene lasts about 4 minutes.


Answer the following:

a. Summarize the plot elements in this scene.


b. List and rank sound elements (speech/effects/music)

 

c. Answer ONE of the following questions:

1. Describe how the music [or sound track elements] shifts from diegetic/nondiegetic and/or onscreen/offscreen status. Then briefly explain how these movements forward or relate to the narrative.

2. How does the music  [or sound track elements] create or contribute to a sense of continuity in this scene? Among things to consider: levels of sync points, overall shape, presence/absence, transitions, pacing (tempo), textures.



Information for Exam 2                                                          spring 2009
This is a unit exam that covers Part II of the text (chs. 5-9). The format will be the same as in Exam 1: two sections: (1) questions on information from the chapters; (2) two film clips requiring text/paragraph responses. 


The best way to prepare is to go over the general statements and terms for film form (ch.5) and film style (ch.8) and for the different scene types (chs. 6, 7, & 9). Just reviewing the terms for Quiz 2 will cover some of that ground. 


For the film clips, the questions will be about scene characteristics, not narrative functions, and so the preparation is basically the same -- go over the general statements and terms for the different scene types (chs. 6, 7, & 9).
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David Neumeyer,
Apr 5, 2009, 1:56 PM
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